Posts from the “tips and inspiration” Category

It’s A Photography Contest!

I am officially kicking off my newly revamped photography community blog with the first of many monthly photo contests.

This month’s theme: Motherhood

Prize: $20.00 gift card Best buy and feature on The Daily Viewfinder.com

To Enter, go to The Daily Viewfinder Facebook page and upload your image via comment on the current months contest announcement.

This is definitely open to interpretation. Portraiture of course will lend itself to this months theme, but I will be updating my blog with other ideas that will support “Motherhood.”

Winners will be announced at the end of every month.

Bath-Mary-Cassatt

Mary Cassat

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Spring Is In the Air!

It’s been a few years since I have taken advantage of my proximity to the Tulip fields near my home in Bellingham, Washington. What a treat! If you are reading this from another part of the country, do yourself a favor and visit Western Washington in the Spring. I have never in my life seen more color. The Rhododendrons are starting to bloom in about every hue imaginable. The impossibly vibrant Azaleas are due to show themselves at any moment. The fruit trees are lining the streets with their white and pink fluffiness. The spectacle of it all is really magical and appreciated by all who survived the gloomy winters.

Here are some photos I took in Skagit County, in the Tulip fields.

 

Expect Nothing, Get an Owl

It has been a long and gradual journey for me from casual to serious photographer. I first picked up a SLR back in community college, when I was being instructed how to shoot slides of my artwork. At the time (and for most things today) tools involving numbers or precision did not appeal to me in the least. For some reason, this tool with its focus ring, light meters and shutter speeds, really spoke to me and it wasn’t long until I spent a hefty chunk of my student-job paycheck on the cheapest 35mm SLR I could find. At first, I went fully automatic on all the settings, but I eventually came to a point where I could work fully manual. Back then, success to me meant creating photographs that were in focus and exposed well. My compositions were just so-s0, and none of my images were of a quality I would consider very artistic. That was frustrating. I was a decent artist that could draw and paint well. I understood perspective, lighting, color, tonality and line, but all my images just looked like snapshots…and I wanted them to look like Ansel Adams. Turns out, composition is HUGE in photography, and it would take me many more years of study for that to really sink in. With painting, if something doesn’t work, you can change it. In photography, you work with what you get! What a challenge. I had to learn P A T I E N C E.

Dang it! Patience. Waiting. Slowing down. Acceptance vs. anxiety. Going with the flow. All that stuff you see in the inexhaustible stream of Memes on social media today. Patience; the word that all of my instructors at one time directed towards my stubborn ears until the one day I finally embraced another concept and patience finally penetrated my young thick skull. I became humble. I realized I could actually get help from people and it was okay. I became a better student and my art and photography began to improve.

Twenty years later and I am still learning the rewards of patience. Learning that some days are going to yield amazing photographs, while others might only provide a single cup of good coffee, is an ongoing lesson for me.

Last week, I was in one of my favorite parks I use to prime my creative juices. I wasn’t really expecting much, but I was hopeful. There are a lot of places to shoot water, but the sun was already high and I wasn’t going to be able to take very long exposures. I decided I would just shoot trees and plants. Since it is a heavily wooded area, I could catch splashes of light hitting random sections of limbs and trunks of the cedar and firs. I wasn’t getting anything spectacular, but I was in acceptance of my situation and allowed myself to enjoy the smells of the park and the coolness of the air coming of the stream. After gathering up my gear, I headed towards a walk bridge and spotted something sitting on a tree limb. Almost immediately after I spotted it, a patch of light hit the object and I saw that it was a Barred Owl!

After a minute or so of admiring this beautiful bird, I suddenly thought, “camera!” I desperately dug out my camera from my bag and fitted my longer zoom and began shooting. To get it’s attention, I began making “hoot” sounds and knocking on the hand- rail of the bridge. It would slowly rotate its head long enough for me to get a few shots before returning back to whatever it was gazing on before. To push my luck, I decided to slowly walk around the owl on a trail that would get me another angle. After snapping some photos from the new angle, I looked over in the direction it was gazing and noticed a mother duck and its ducklings. Bonus! I was too far away to get a tight shot of the duck, but the lighting and the greenery in the foreground made for a nice composition.

It was a great nature photography day for sure. In the past, I would of looked at the harsh lighting and not pursued picture taking on a day like that. Experience has taught me that you can make just about any lighting situation work, and with enough patience and the right mind set, even your worst photo outings will be rewarding.

Thanks for stopping by! If there is a photography topic you would like to read, whether it be technical or artistic, let me know. I am happy to share all I know-Shawn Pagels

The WatchWho Goes There SmallGuardianSmallMotherhood

 

 

 

 

The Strength Of Solitude

Give your landscape and nature photographs more emotional potency by creating a narrative between a single subject and its environment.

 

Landscape photographers face a unique challenge in trying to simplify their images when there is an infinite amount of subject matter to try and compose in a single cohesive image. A great way to focus your pictures into well composed and poignant works of art is to establish a primary subject and capture the role your subject is playing in its surroundings.

to_the_rock_by_starbirdsky-d6k4aew

The single surfer in the water facing the large rock creates a story. In an image like this, it’s easy for the viewer to make an emotional connection by imagining him/herself as the surfer. This example works well because there is a human subject used, but the same principle can be applied to just about anything.

parked_seagull_by_starbirdsky-d75y1lr

I chose not to zoom in close on this seagull. Instead, I gave the bird plenty of room and placed him resting surrounded by plenty of sky. I prefer the feeling of a free bird over a caged bird and by giving the primary subject plenty of space to breathe, the desired feeling was conveyed in this photograph.

damsel_by_starbirdsky-d7854gv

A leafless little tree isn’t the first thing that pops in your head when you’re thinking of ideas for nature or landscape photography. Here I composed around a single leafless tree that is wedged in a coastal rock. By itself, the tree wouldn’t have given much of a narrative. However, shown here growing out of rough and lifeless rock, the viewer can see the persistence of life; a young tree starting life with a strong and solid foundation.

Challenge yourself to find these narratives. Having a story or an analogy in mind when shooting a photograph will make you grow as an artist. A technically sound photograph will always be admired, but the image that makes an emotional connection will be remembered.

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

Go Ahead, Be a Square

We are all taught in art school or photography classes about portrait and landscape formats and the appropriate uses of them. Today, I want to demonstrate the power of the square! If done right, presenting an image in a square format can make a bold statement. There is something kind of hip about ignoring rules and putting something out there that looks a little different from the rest. With that in mind, there are a few things you want to look out for to avoid making your image look less like a statement and more like a mistake!

Composition: 

As in other formats, you want to remember some basic rules of good composition. Think thirds and avoid dividing the picture in half will keep the image dynamic(if this is your intent). Try not to pull the eye out of the picture by cropping lines or high contrast objects out of the frame.

Sluggish

In this example, there are lines leading away from the subject matter, but they are minimized by the use of value. The brightest and highest contrast is on the Slug shaped fallen tree.

Abstract:

Another great way to use this format is by creating an abstract image. Use pattern, shape and rhythm to make images that resemble abstract paintings.

Rothko Day

I titled this one “Rothko Day” after the famous painter. There are three major bands going across this picture with enough detail to retain a natural element, but remain abstract.

Keep It Moving:

To counter the stagnant nature of the square, choose a photograph that conveys motion.

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The lively nature of this small waterfall keeps the square format lively and visually compelling!

Thanks for reading. Please follow my blog for further articles with examples. Contact me with any questions or comments.

Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

Create Stunning Black and White Images

As some of you may know, I LOVE black and white photography. I am going to show you a few steps that combine some old school techniques with some of the best ways you can use photoshop to make amazing looking photographs. First of all, for optimal control of your image, Always shoot in color. I know cameras now have settings that are really cool like sepia mode and panorama, but to get top quality black and whites when shooting digital we can use all that color information to our advantage:

Original Image: 

originalSimple

 

Bland, greyscale mode switch or desaturation:

When I first started exploring black and white photography with my digital camera, I would often just switch the color mode to greyscale or simply desaturate the color.

originalSimpleGreyscale

The images were left looking flat and I would try to compensate by adjusting the contrast or the brightness levels.

Black and White Conversion:

For better results, make a duplicate of the original image and do a black and white conversion. In photoshop, select image, then adjustment, then black and white.

menuCrop

Once you select this, you will see a color adjustment slider window.

 

channelscrop

This is where your eyes are your real tools. Different scenery will benefit from different settings. In this example, I achieved more detail and some interesting tonal variation in the background rocks by sliding the reds to the left (making them darker) and the yellows to the right(making them lighter) Some other adjustments were made across the spectrum to give the image more sparkle.

adjustments

As you can see, we are already seeing more detail and greater tonal variation across the whole image. Now to apply an old school technique.

Dodge and Burn: 

(well in this case, only dodging). Ansel Adams used this technique for darkening and lightening areas of his work in the dark room, If he did it, so can we! In the tool bar, select the dodge tool and adjust the brush size to lighten some small areas. Make sure the setting is for highlights.

dodgecrop

In the rock in the foreground, I selected some areas to lighten, including the bit of water underneath the rock.

dodge application

 

Sharpening:

This next step can make or break a good photograph. Sharpening an image can take it to a higher level. Too much sharpening can create unwanted halos and strange artifacts. To avoid a large halo effect where the sky and cliffs meet, I duplicated the layer and created a graduated mask starting from top to bottom. When I apply sharpening, It will only be seen on the bottom two-thirds of the photograph and will not create an unwanted halo effect along the skyline.

mask

Curves:

Finally, I apply an adjustment layer with curves. Curve adjustments are a better choice than simple brightness, contrast adjustments offering you much more control. It also doesnt degrade your image quality near as much as simply adjusting the brightness and contrast.

curvenotice the slight “S” shape created by inserting points along the lights and darks, this is a good starting point for making effective adjustments.

Final:

Here is a sample of a simple greyscale mode change versus a Black and White Conversion, followed by a large image of the final result:

originalVsfinal

 

final

I hope you found this helpful. Happy Shooting!

Shawn Pagels

Adapting to all weather conditions

Like many other photographers, I often get that “itch” to head outside and capture something amazing. Many of us have family and other responsibilities, so often we can’t just rush out as soon as the light is just right or other atmospheric conditions that would make an absolutely AMAZING picture. I get out and shoot when I can, and when I do, I often take with me those ideas I had worked out from the previous day when I conceived the perfect shot. The only problem is, it’s cloudy and windy and it was perfectly sunny yesterday! There are niche photographers that focus on this or that and that is great, but for the rest of us who are always seeking to improve the craft of photography, being adaptive is crucial to exercising our creative minds and being productive. Here are a few “non-ideal” weather conditions and a few things you can do with them:

Cloudy and Overcast: 

Color! That’s right, color radiates in these conditions because there isn’t a harsh light source bouncing brightness around.

It’s anti-intuitive in a way, but bright sunlight washes color out of a lot of scenes. Longer exposures with a tripod is more effective in these conditions too!

devilInBlueLakeparadiseTrail

Bright Mid-day Sun:

Painters and photographers alike have always praised the early morning and evening light for the color and the wonderful drama it can create. But, what if you can’t get out at this time and when you do get out, the sun is beating down creating hard shadows everywhere?

Black and White! While these conditions might not be best suited for lush and colorful landscapes, they can be perfect for creating striking black and white images with lots of rhythm
and contrast.

mostThingsDon'tLastWebRemnants4

Windy, Rainy, Yucky:

Now might be a time to consider setting up a still life and doing an interior shot. There are many artists you can research online that have made careers out of doing incredible still lifes that are profoundly beautiful. Select items that either convey a theme with the objects themselves or share a color relationship. If you had your heart on going outside and facing the nasty weather anyway, make sure you have your camera protected and be mindful about all the things blowing around out there. Landscapes might be out of the question because trees, grass and other foliage will be moving around too much. This of course might also be a nice effect if there were a stationary object of interest nearby. City-scapes and architecture can be lovely in these conditions. Again, black and white photography could be a good choice for capturing moody street scenes. Try a faster exposure time to freeze a drop or two!

DSC_3519Complete(a painting I did recently, sorry couldn’t find a photoraphic still-life…but, you get the idea;))
Now, be adaptive and shoot!
-Shawn Pagels

Keep Something Upfront-tips for shooting wide

Hope

When shooting wide angle landscapes or waterscapes, take advantage of the focal range by placing something of interest in the foreground. Even if the foreground has an interesting texture, it will lend to the composition and increase the sense of depth in your photograph. The light was very nice the day I took this shot. Since I shot in early spring, color wasn’t giving me much to work with, so I stuck a nd 4 and a polarizing filter on my Tokina 11-16 to allow for darker skies and a longer exposure to smooth the water a bit. Happy shooting!

 

 

 

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