Like many other photographers, I often get that “itch” to head outside and capture something amazing. Many of us have family and other responsibilities, so often we can’t just rush out as soon as the light is just right or other atmospheric conditions that would make an absolutely AMAZING picture. I get out and shoot when I can, and when I do, I often take with me those ideas I had worked out from the previous day when I conceived the perfect shot. The only problem is, it’s cloudy and windy and it was perfectly sunny yesterday! There are niche photographers that focus on this or that and that is great, but for the rest of us who are always seeking to improve the craft of photography, being adaptive is crucial to exercising our creative minds and being productive. Here are a few “non-ideal” weather conditions and a few things you can do with them:

Cloudy and Overcast: 

Color! That’s right, color radiates in these conditions because there isn’t a harsh light source bouncing brightness around.

It’s anti-intuitive in a way, but bright sunlight washes color out of a lot of scenes. Longer exposures with a tripod is more effective in these conditions too!

devilInBlueLakeparadiseTrail

Bright Mid-day Sun:

Painters and photographers alike have always praised the early morning and evening light for the color and the wonderful drama it can create. But, what if you can’t get out at this time and when you do get out, the sun is beating down creating hard shadows everywhere?

Black and White! While these conditions might not be best suited for lush and colorful landscapes, they can be perfect for creating striking black and white images with lots of rhythm
and contrast.

mostThingsDon'tLastWebRemnants4

Windy, Rainy, Yucky:

Now might be a time to consider setting up a still life and doing an interior shot. There are many artists you can research online that have made careers out of doing incredible still lifes that are profoundly beautiful. Select items that either convey a theme with the objects themselves or share a color relationship. If you had your heart on going outside and facing the nasty weather anyway, make sure you have your camera protected and be mindful about all the things blowing around out there. Landscapes might be out of the question because trees, grass and other foliage will be moving around too much. This of course might also be a nice effect if there were a stationary object of interest nearby. City-scapes and architecture can be lovely in these conditions. Again, black and white photography could be a good choice for capturing moody street scenes. Try a faster exposure time to freeze a drop or two!

DSC_3519Complete(a painting I did recently, sorry couldn’t find a photoraphic still-life…but, you get the idea;))
Now, be adaptive and shoot!
-Shawn Pagels
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